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Archive for February 19th, 2010


The word “Nippon” found in the back stamp on asian porcelain means Japan.  Nippon china was made strictly for export to the U.S. by Japanese artisans who hand painted the porcelain.  Japanese painters thought the scenes were garrish but it was a profitable trade from 1865 to 1921. During the Meiji period 1868 – 1912, much of the porcelain was decorated with gold trim. There are many Nippon china backstamps that were in use during this time, representing the many different porcelain factories of Japan. One of the more successful makers was “Noritake”, which I will discuss in part 3 of this blog.  I have many peices of “Nippon” made by the Noritake company with their backstamp.  Here is an example of a Nippon, very nice Cigarette set with tray, ashtray, match holder and humidor from my collection:

                           

VERY COLORFUL.                                                                                           FAMOUS “GREEN” “NIPPON” BACKSTAMP

Because the Noritake factory subcontracted to other porcelain manufacturers in Japan, there are as many as 400 different markings for Noritake from 1891 – present.

Here are a few more from the late 19th to early 20th century:

    

PEICES PRODUCED BEFORE 1921 ALL HAVE “NIPPON” PRINTED ON THE BACKSTAMP.

ALL OF THESE STAMPS ARE THE PREDESSOR OF THE MORIMURA BROTHERS WHO RAN THE NORITAKE FACTORY BEGINNING IN 1904

In my next blog post I will discuss Lustreware made in the early 20th century, why “Nippon” was not in the backstamp after 1921 and the beginings of the Morimura dynasty in Japanese porcelain.

Until then Happy collecting and remember that the best is yet to come.

         

3/11/2010  Purchased three Nippon (Tobbaciana) ashtrays.  The middle one with blue rising sun mark and the other two with the green M mark.

            

 

 

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