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Posts Tagged ‘Bonanzle’


There are a number of Nippon pieces decorated with desert scenes. This seems to be a popular and highly collectible motif at this time. The pieces found feature palm trees, Bedouin tents, mosques and other buildings, and Arabs on camels.  Some of the Middle Eastern men are found wrapped in a long white robes with a hood that is called a jalabijya.  Most of these scenes are realistic looking. 

From my collection:

         

A beautiful Nippon Stein with Desert Scene. Maker’s mark #47.

 

    

A very nice Camel Rider, Nippon ashtray with the Makers’ mark #47.

 

         

Palm Trees on the Oasis, marked with the Maker’s mark #47.

 

The Arab/Desert scene vases seem to command the highest prices.  A recent auction of a particularly nice camel rider urn 16″H sold for over $2000.00.

As I said earlier this is a popular motif.  To see more of my Nippon collection visit my store at : 

Just put your cursor on my assistant “The Duck” in the upper right hand corner of this post and press enter.

Until next time Happy Collecting and remember that “The best is yet to come.”

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Among Nipponear’s the Cleopatra’s Barge Scene is  familiar.  You can find this motif on chargers, plaques, vases, urns, smoking sets, and jugs, both the wine and whiskey jug.  The story goes that Cleopatra fell in love with Marc Antony and they ruled Egypt and Rome together.  It was said that Cleopatra once came sailing up the river Cydnus on a barge that had outspread sails of purple and oars of silver. The barge supposedly had a gilded stem and Cleopatra sat under a canopy of gold cloth dressed as Venus.  A sight to behold I am sure.

But since we were not there we can only dream and imagine what the royal lives of such as those like Cleopatra was truly like.  To help us imagine such scenes are the beautiful hand painted artwork of Japanese painters from the early 20th century.

         

This is a very nice 12″ charger of  Cleopatra’s Barge, matte finish. The name given this Nippon motif.  Recently purchased and added to my collection.

A very similar 10 1/4″ wall plaque with the Nippon green mark #47 is listed in Joan VanPatten’s ABC’s of Collecting Nippon Porcelain on page 203 and listed at $400.00 to $475.00, 2005 price guide. With the charger I received a nice bonus piece.

    

Vase 5 1/2″ with excellent gold gilding, matte finish.  Mint condition.  Green mark #47.

  

Most normally you will find Cleopatra’s Barge motif in orange background with lavender highlights but occasionally you may see a “hard to find” piece that is particularly alluring such as this lavender/blue Cleopatra’s barge. Note that the bow of the barge is different but the background scene is the same.  This ashtray is not in a VanPatten book and I own all 7 series. I was excited to get this piece. However there is a wall plaque of a blue Cleopatra’s Barge lavender/blue as shown in The Collector’s Encyclopedia of Nippon, Joan VanPatten 1979, Plate 355 on page 217.

    

Cleopatra’s Barge motif in lavender/blue with white highlights, an unusual find.  Ashtray is 3 1/2″ C  by 1  1/4″ H  Green mark #47

If you are collecting Nippon or Noritake I would highly recommend some reference books on these wares.  Not necessarily to find items that are listed in the books but to find the items that are not listed.  Those not listed are the most exciting because you never know,  that one piece might be a “hard to find” piece or production from that mold and/or the color is uncommon. 

I would recommend the Nippon books by Joan VanPatten and also The Wonderful World of Nippon Porcelain 1891 – 1921 by Kathy Wojciehowski.  It wouldn’t hurt to also have Noritake Collectibles A to Z by David Spain.  I come across many Noritake pieces that are the same mold and even the same design as Nippon pieces and sometimes just as well painted although without the “Nippon” on the backstamp.   Also a copy of 2010 Antique Trader by Dan Brownell or a Kovell’s 2010 price guide. Indispensible for collecting and antique-ing.

Here are a few more very nice recent acquisitions:

Nippon wall plaque, 10 1/4″, green mark #47. Listed in VanPatten’s ABC of Collecting, 2005 on page 300.  Mint condition.

  

Very similar to the “Green Swan Scene.”  8 3/4″ plaque also listed in the ABC’s of Nippon by VanPatten. Blue mark #52 which dates this plaque to as far back as 1891.

  

Nippon 10″ plaque, country cottage in brown, pink and lavender highlights with beautiful enamel moriage trim. Green mark # 47.

  

Just a note about plates, plaques and chargers. A plate is not just a plate.  If labeled a plaque it has two holes on its backside to hang the plaque on the wall. A charger is normally larger than a 9 1/2″ plate, usually 12″ to 14″ and can be round or square. Does not hang without a bracket to hang it with.  Normally displayed on a large plate holder which occasionally comes with the plate otherwise you would have to buy one.  A plate usually has multiple copies and ranges from 9″ to 9 3/4″ and normally does not have ornate moriage trimwork. Plates should have matching pieces ie; cups, saucers, bowls etc.

Soon I will be receiving a shipment of more hard to find and interesting pieces of Nippon so make sure to check back often. Until then Happy Collecting and remember “the best is yet to come.”

  

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The Second World War (abbreviated WWII) was a global military conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945 which involved most of the world’s nations, including all great powers, organised into two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis.  It was the most widespread war in history, with more than 100 million military personnel mobilised.  In a state of “total war,” the majority participants placed their entire economic, industrial and scientific capabilities towards the war effort erasing the distinction between civilian and military resources. This war was marked by significant acts against civilians, the Holocaust and Nuclear bombs. It was the deadliest conflict in human history with over seventy million casualties.

The start of the war is generally believed to be September 1, 1939, when Nazi Germany invaded Poland. Most European countries such as France and the British declared war on Nazi Germany at that time. Those that were not involved in war eventually joined the coalition in response to events of aggression against them such as the German invasion of Russia and the Japanese attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor and on British colonies that triggered war on Japan by the United States, Britain and the Netherlands.

The war ended in 1945 in an Allied victory and a changed world.  The United Nations was established to enhance cooperation among nations and at the same time the U.S. and Russia (two Super Powers) entered into a “cold war”  that lasted for the next 46 years. Throughout this period of time Western Europe moved towards economic recovery and only recently in history has the world moved towards political integration opening up international business and foreign trade for average American citizens like you and I.

My mother was 23 years old at the beginning of the war. Trained as a school teacher but having other interest she moved from the farm where she was raised in the midwest to California and was involved in the war effort as an arc welder on airplanes.  My father also in his 20s was drafted in the Navy and served as a boilerman on a destroyer  based in the Philipines but visiting San Francisco occasionally which is where my parents met.  It is a fascinating time of history and the collectibles from the war years are varied and many.  Here are a few of my own:

         

A 48 star American Flag that flew on the destroyer USS Ellet during the war and a picture of the destroyer. ca. 1942

 

I have had many questions as to the authenticity of this flag.  The flag belonged to my father who served on the USS Ellet in WW II and was given the flag by the ship’s Captain. Also, doing my research I found that the size of the flag is important.  The flag is 29″ x 57″.  Many of the commercial civilain flags sold during this period would have been too large to fly on a ship and not sturdy enough to endure the weather at sea. Also the number of grommets on the flag are important. Many of the civilian commercially sold flags of the period have two grommets or none.  This authentic Navy flag has four grommets.  The clincher is that this flag is clearly stamped U.S. ENS – 11. This is a Naval quartermaster issue number.  If you still don’t believe then do your own research.  Find out what size and kind of flags were issued to Naval ships in WWII, they were standard issue.  It’s not that hard.  In addition to that I have my father’s DD 214 which documents his service as well as my grandfather’s Army discharge paperwork from WW I, as a machinegunner, my brother’s DD 214 documenting his Vietnam service as a comabt engineer and my own DD 214 and many documets showing  that I served faithfully as an Army Combat Medic for 23 years. I retired in 1994.  My family has a history of military service and it is documented.

    

A naval Training Unit ca. 1941.  Every man signed the back and where they were from.  All were participants of  WW II.

         

Interesting documents requesting permission to bring back to U.S. from Germany captured military equipment ie; 1 German Rifle

 

         

WW II Songbook for Soldiers and Sailors and song sheet pamphlet. Official Issue.

The first photo is of a U. S. WW II Songbook “Songs of the Soldiers and Sailors”.  Has some nice WW II photos in it and of course many military songs of the period.  This was an official U.S. issued item for new recruits and was issued at Camp Zachary to a Pvt. Clarence H. Call.  Pvt. Call made a notation in the song book, “Germans captured Sept. 14th.”  The copyright is the Washington Government Printing Office 1917, Patent applied for. Also shown is a song sheet pamphlet given recruits by the Louisville War Camp Community Service, Louisville, KY. This pamphlet was compiled by E. Rowland Dawson, War Department Commission on Traininig Camp Activities.

         

Serving in the U. S. Navy window banner. ca. 1942

Shown above is a window banner that Momma’s put in the front picture window of their home proudly showing their support for their boys faithful service during WW II.

         

Navy pennant. U. S. Naval Training Center, Farragut, Idaho

         

Fancy pillow cover,  WW II, Red, White and Blue, “God Bless America”.

 

    

Occupied Japan figurines.

 

    

A beer Stein made in the WW II French Zone immediately after the War.

 

WWII collectibles are not hard to find and are an eclectic group of items.  For instance I used to have an ashtray shaped into a bomber that was made from brass shell casings.  Start looking for those interesting WWII collectibles it is a great period to collect for.  Visit my store on eBay to see more WWII artifacts or check out my booth at Bonanzle. URL is listed in Blogroll at the right.

For all collectors, happy collecting and remember “the best is yet to come.”

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